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sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6188
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 18 1:46 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

I hope you're feeling better!

Nice colour. I take it it's not edible?

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34295
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 18 8:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

imho ( and maybe wrong ) it looks like a sulfur waxcap.

they are quite variable and like some of their rellies can pass for several species from the same growth

not dinner

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3429
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 18 9:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

sgt.colon wrote:
I hope you're feeling better!

Nice colour. I take it it's not edible?



Just about back to normal now, thanks. Spent three days in hospital having had a minor (very) stroke. At least I got a ride in an ambulance, blue lights and all!

Henry

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3429
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 18 9:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:
imho ( and maybe wrong ) it looks like a sulfur waxcap.

they are quite variable and like some of their rellies can pass for several species from the same growth

not dinner


Mr Myco did mention what type it was, but I have forgotten, though Sulphur doesn't ring any bells.


Henry

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10047

PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 18 6:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Sorry to hear you have been ill Henry. Hope you are completely recovered now. That must have been rather frightening for both you and your family.

Nice picture. I found an interesting ink cap when we went for a walk in the New Forest the other day. It doesn't have an English name, but found it growing out of what looked like cow dung. Can't find it at the moment, but found it easily enough in Phillips.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3429
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 18 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Mistress Rose wrote:
Sorry to hear you have been ill Henry. Hope you are completely recovered now. That must have been rather frightening for both you and your family.

Nice picture. I found an interesting ink cap when we went for a walk in the New Forest the other day. It doesn't have an English name, but found it growing out of what looked like cow dung. Can't find it at the moment, but found it easily enough in Phillips.



The most frightening bit was for poor Jaki, driving after the ambulance (not keeping up with the blue lights!). When they got me to the hospital they took me into a ward through a door conspicuously labelled RESUSCITATION, though I was fine. (I presume all the other beds in A&E were occupied.) So of course Jaki, arriving a few minutes later, was terrified for a brief while as they showed her where I was! But I was sitting up looking the same as when she last saw me.


I've found Snowy Inkcap (Coprinus niveus) on cow dung - might that have been the one?

Henry

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3429
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 18 2:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

My nice yellow Waxcap was either Hygrocybe conica or Hygrocybe acutoconica but Mr Myco did not want to pick it to find out which one. He does not say exactly why he didn't want to pick it - he's usually happy to pick a fungus, give it a bit of a nibble or pop it into his little box for microscope attention at home.


Henry

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34295
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 18 3:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

ta very similar to what i call sulfur wax caps, i might lump a few spp under the name

not dinner but not class 4 toxic so i guess no pick is down to rarity

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3429
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 18 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Out to an area of flooded gravel pits with a few bits and pieces of other habitats (woodland, meadow, hedgerows) in the mix.

Quite a few wetland birds including a Green Sandpiper which is apparently quite uncommon. Only saw it at a distance and could not detect any green on it at all!

Also saw two Great White Egrets (Ardea alba) which are like white Herons and also rather uncommon:





Only seen at quite a distance so picture is not very good.


Assorted butterflies were about in the sunshine including Small Coppers.

Along one section of path we saw several Hornets (Vespa crabro) and a little further along we found out why!




I hope the birds had finished with it!

Henry

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34295
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 18 10:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    


Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10047

PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 18 6:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Egrets are becoming quite common round this way; in fact see them more often than herons.

The hornets nest is interesting. I have seen them build inside trees, but never actually seen the nest as it is hidden. We get them in the woods quite often, and there is a nest somewhere this year as we have had them in the yard quite frequently. Beautiful insects with orange stripey bodies and bright pink legs.

Not seen so many butterflies lately and think most of them have been speckled woods.

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6188
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 18 10:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That hornet's nest is very cool and alien looking. Great photos Buzzy.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3429
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 18 10:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

MR, I think the egrets you see are probably mostly Little Egrets (Egretta garzetta). We get quite a few of those as well. They are smaller than Great White Egrets, which are Grey Heron sized. Little Egrets have black beaks, and as you can just see in my picture, Great Whites have yellow beaks. Correct me if I'm wrong - but the reactions of some of the birdy people led me to think that Great White Egrets were special!

Henry

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10047

PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 18 6:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I think you are right Buzzy. Sorry, I didn't realise the difference. I have never been close enough to study the beak, but they are usually quite a bit smaller than a heron, so almost certainly the smaller ones. That is special if the Great White Egrets are quite rare. A good sighting.

I don't remember seeing Little egrets when I was a child, so are they becoming more common?

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3429
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 18 10:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yes, Little Egrets are recent colonists, following a range expansion in Europe. First bred in Britain in the 1990s, I believe.

Possibly Great White Egrets will do the same - we shall have to wait and see!

Henry

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