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Capons
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Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33857
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 15 5:48 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Dunno, you can import them, and it's still done across France, Spain and Italy.

Falstaff



Joined: 27 May 2009
Posts: 1014

PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 15 7:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

joanne wrote:
Caponing is banned in the UK for being a cruel practice so I doubt anyone has tasted true capons in a very long time


I don't think that's quite right, Caponising (Castrating) chemically is banned that's true. because as far as I know the workers started developing breasts and the like. I believe there were concerns that the chemicals may remain active in the meat and affect consumers.

The taste was far superior to turkey or cockerel and as far as I know it is not illegal to perform the operation surgically - but cost is the problem.

So in answer to Graham's Query, I suppose you need to acquire the pellets from a supplier outside the uk - or learn to do it surgically. - I Did see a set of instructions on the net a few years ago

Graham Hyde



Joined: 03 Apr 2011
Posts: 365

PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 15 8:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hi. Thanks for the replies.

Yes, I am after knowledge of surgical caponizing.

I know it is still practiced in the USA and instruments are available there.

As to cruelty, I guess it's no more than castrating a dog, a horse or pig.

I do remember capons being sold in the UK before the ban, they were quite popular at Christmas as an alternative to turkeys.




Last edited by Graham Hyde on Fri Apr 24, 15 8:35 am; edited 1 time in total

Shan



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 7580
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 15 11:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Graham Hyde wrote:
Hi. Thanks for the replies.

Yes, I am after knowledge of surgical caponizing.

I know it is still practiced in the USA and instruments are available there.

As to cruelty, I guess it's no more than castrating a dog, a horse or pig.



Those procedures are generally practiced with a anaesthetic.

Bebo



Joined: 21 May 2007
Posts: 12562
Location: East Sussex
PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 15 11:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The big difference is that the knackers are outside on a horse, dog or pig. With cockerels you have to cut into them.

Graham Hyde



Joined: 03 Apr 2011
Posts: 365

PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 15 12:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hi. Thanks for the responses.

There are lots of sites on the web showing how, there are professionals who complete the task in under a minute, I know the procedure of cutting and removing, my comments about cruelty related to the state of the animal after the removal, what I asked for was and I quote......

Has anyone on DS'ers caponized a bird or can anyone recommend a book regarding this?

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33857
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 15 12:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

This is Downsizer. We answer the question we wanted you to ask.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44144
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 15 1:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nick wrote:
This is Downsizer. We answer the question we wanted you to ask.




Graham has a lot to learn

mal55



Joined: 15 Jul 2009
Posts: 153
Location: N.Lincs or in the dog house
PostPosted: Mon May 04, 15 3:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I thought caponising was illegal right the way across the EU with any caponised birds being imported.
Chemical castration is also illegal for obvious reasons. I'm not sure but the chemicals used may have been used for bringing bitches into season so there's no way you'd want your daughters to eat the stuff let alone your sons! There were cases of farmers who lived largely off their own produce developing breasts.
I remember when I was a kid, a man a couple of doors up bought a couple of chemically castrated cockerels to fatten up for Christmas and let one run on for Easter. The thing was about the same size as a donkey (to a small boy) when the chemical implant wore off. It lost it's placid naure and reverted to aggressive cockerel mode. It absolutely terrorized the street. Us kids weren't allowed out on our own in case the cockerel attacked us and women took their lives in their hands when hanging out washing. It attacked the owner's daughter and he went for it with an axe (he was a lorry driver in the pre-power steering days) and it pushed him through a 6 foot hedge. At the finish he got Mr Rowson to come and shoot the bloomin' thing!!
Happy days!!

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34295
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon May 04, 15 7:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    



interfering with nature has implications

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1957
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Mon May 04, 15 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I have eaten capon, which is tender and delicious. Never even thought about attempting the surgery.

Probably be good idea to take a couple of freshly dead cockerels. Cut one open to see where what is located. Then practice on dead birds until you are comfortable attempting it on a live one.

Or see if you can obtain better bred meat type chickens than the gamecock type that are likely more common where you are located.

Woo



Joined: 19 Sep 2011
Posts: 780
Location: Mayenne, Pays de Loire
PostPosted: Sat May 09, 15 7:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It is still practiced in France. there was even a program on channel 4 about the culinary benefits. Jimmy Doherty, I think.
he didn't give instruction just commented on the practice to get HUGE meat birds.
It's seen like the practice of castrating piglets and lambs. 'Bah OUI!'
not something I want to get information on.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34295
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat May 09, 15 2:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

as a slight aside ,i cooked a m n s organic chicken last night

it was on it's sell by date so a tenner rather than 17

dressed weight 2.4 k which is big enough for a good meat to bone ratio

ie a similar size to yer average capon but without the hormones or cutting

it looks like this sasso bird will make at least ten meal portions + stock and dog bones

perhaps trying to find and obtain sasso meat birds would give the required result and avoid the "issues"of capons

im surprised they are not global cos they can turn chook food into meat very effectively .

other birds have super characteristics in specific conditions but a well fed organic sasso can be a big un (a few are more roadrunner in style )and they do seem to work in an organic /free range style( better than with a short broiler life) in terms of point of use for taste,texture and size .

long lived ,small,nasty tempered free range cocks might have the medal for best taste in a stew but the terminal generation sort of chook seems acceptable in meat birds and sasso are better after a happytime than broiler ones might indicate .

grannie had rhode island red x sussex as meat birds which worked quite well and a 6 to 12 month beast could be a 3kg lump in the kitchen

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34295
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon May 11, 15 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

a quick google suggests that sasso are available in some parts of the philipines as day old or month old free range raised birds

given plenty of time and a decent diet they do make good meat birds

there are some bits of info that suggest at least part of their genetics was sourced from your area

Graham Hyde



Joined: 03 Apr 2011
Posts: 365

PostPosted: Wed May 13, 15 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hi Dpack

I bought six, day old chicks for meat, I don't know the breed, pure white, about 30 pence here, ready for the table in 40 days. I kept for three months and they were monsters, docile but very large. The dressed weight of the cockerel was about two and a half kilo.

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