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sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6844
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Sun Jun 28, 20 2:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Thanks for that DPack. I need to have a look at what Mrs C has found. Dropping something solid in there will be easier that tiling and possible easier to keep clean.

Did you see the photo with the sticking out brick in? What are your thoughts please on me removing the bricks and straightening it or even removing them if they are not needed.

Thanks.

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 4354
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Sun Jun 28, 20 2:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Regarding them stepped bricks that support the arch,if you want to remove the stepped support,the correct way
would be to replace with a flat steel band,bend to the radius of the arch,easy enough when building it,but not so to match existing arch,beings your plastering the face you could drop the lower part of arch,fit flat band and replace bricks,
But thinking again,you could make a template with the correct radius and get one made with a blacksmith.

Just a suggestion, of what I`ve done on an ongoing installation,for an hearth,is a piece of slate,5ft by 18ins set on a course of Staffordshire blue bricks with a Flemish bond,header ,stretcher etc.

jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 26979
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Sun Jun 28, 20 3:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

That is an impressive transformation

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38503
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Jun 28, 20 3:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

i might work with the stepped bricks, make them an interesting feature not a problem

at this stage doing metalwork seems unnecessary

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8842
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Sun Jun 28, 20 4:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I expect you know, or maybe someone has already said, but there are rules about the size of the hearth - it has to stick out so much further than the woodburner etc.

we made one with reclaimed granite paving stones bedded in limecrete, and the kitchen one has the original hearth stone at the front and we just laid cement on the back. Both have time capsules underneath...

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6844
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 20 9:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I'm now wanting to start laying the hearth. We are using tiles and I've been looking online about what sort of adhesive to use. Places like Topps tiles say to use a heat resistant adhesive, where as people on forums say about using just a flexible tile adhesive.

So I thought I'd ask what you guys thought?

Thanks

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 4354
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 20 11:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

The only hearths i`ve ever put down have been one piece Slate or Blue Pennant Sandstone and old type quarry tiles all cemented down.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38503
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 20 12:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

heat resistant adhesive, good spacing, heat resistant grout

or

press them into a decent thickness of lime and cement mortar, screeded flat inside a frame to shutter the outside edges
level them with a board, grout when set

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6844
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 20 7:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Thank you both.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38503
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 20 5:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

ps if you are playing with tiles do a "dry"layout first

cutting as you go is a nightmare even for those who do it regularly

if you need to cut do you have access to water cooled wheel cutter?
they work far better than scratch and snap

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 7004
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 20 6:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Good advice, does a good job, keeps the dust down, easy to use...earmuffs advisable

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5773
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 20 12:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I only needed to cut two tiles for our stove's hearth, and I ended up buying a tile cutting wheel for my angle grinder. Wore a good mask and did it outside, easy peasy clean line and no need to rent a wetsaw.
We were just making a rectangle with dimensions of the tiles as guides, however. Might not be worth it for lots of fiddly cuts to squeeze into an old fireplace.

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6844
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 20 7:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Funny you should mention those things DPack. Mrs C and I were only talking at weekend about laying the tiles out before I lay them as they are all different patterns and colours, so we want a good mix.

I was also talking to a lady at work a few weeks ago about laying a hearth and she said she had a wet tile cutter I could borrow. So it's sat in our house now just waiting to be used.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38503
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 20 8:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    



have a practice before you go for the important ones

it is messy so outside is good as is decent ppe

i cut jet with my one, that is very messy, black/brown splatter is rather victorian black and red devil from whitby

the glaze on tiles can do good shrap in an eye, but any tile can do chunks
most will cut nicely with nowt worse than some slurry spray

put enough water in it
use a push stick if you need to cut close to the disk
be careful of sleeves, hair etc

when you measure and/or dry fit allow for the width of the disk, most take about 3 to 5 mm as a bite
you need to measure to the side of that line

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6844
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 20 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Thanks DPack. That advice is much appreciated.

Pictures will follow once I'm done.

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