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dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 43434
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 23 2:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

some interesting wildlife studies

only seen sexton beetles once, above ground, doing their undertaking thing

it took a bit over an hour to bury a rat, which for two medium size beetles was splendid civil engineering even on fairly soft ground

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 43434
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 23 3:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

that was new, tis bright and rather blustery

the large gull was working hard to get height and speed

then i spotted grin on it's 6

as they went out of sight it looked like grin was just choosing the right moment for a grab

gulls are quite robust, that one was 3 times the size of grin, grin seemed quite confident it could handle the situation

ps gulls are a "taste" i will never acquire, maybe grin has a different idea of delicious vs to me

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 43434
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Feb 02, 23 3:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

one female owl, not close, she has a big range and she is rather alone

i thought most of them were missing, there were two pairs with adjoining territories here and plenty more around the greater area

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 14637

PostPosted: Thu Feb 02, 23 8:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Any idea what sort of owl Dpack? We get quite a lot of tawny owls in the woods. I expect we will start hearing them soon as they pair up.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 43434
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Feb 02, 23 2:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

tawny

ps i have seen little owls here a couple of times, one eating a sammison the other trying to stand on a slack washing line which was rather funny,
they seem to hang out on the ings
the tawny ones were quite common in urban/suburban york

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 43434
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 23 7:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

it seems that butterfly counts have a similar trend to bird counts journo report

oh well, bryophytes and tardigrades will probably be ok somewhere, they have practised this sort of thing a few times

in good news there is a resident male blackbird, which probably means a female has set up home
im not sure of the location, it may be the brack's old homestead, probably the ones i spotted a little while back

the local(one km radius from here)rough blackbird census gives maybe 10% numbers compared to before the heat event, some of them are colonists rather than survivors

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 14637

PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 23 8:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

We saw white admirals and possibly wood whites last year, but I wouldn't know a grayling if I saw one, so not sure about them. We have silver washed fritillaries but not pearl bordered. One problem with woodland butterflies is lack of management. Because we manage our wood including coppice there are open areas with flowers so the butterflies have somewhere to feed. Deep dark woods are not much use for them. I don't think we saw so many fritillaries last year, but they vary year by year.

I think tawny owls are the most common Dpack. We have seen a few over the last couple of years, but hear them very regularly.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 43434
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 23 9:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

i have never seen most of the uk ones in the wild

the eagle owl through a night sight was surprising

i was watching the little, tawny and barn owls, there were quite a few hunting voles etc and the thing just loomed huge, wow, at times 4x in IR was rather disturbing

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 43434
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 23 9:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

dpack wrote:
i have never seen most of the uk ones in the wild

the eagle owl through a night sight was surprising

i was watching the little, tawny and barn owls, there were quite a few hunting voles etc and the thing just loomed huge, wow, at times 4x in IR was rather disturbing
just with eyeball silhouette it was very big, big enough to be a danger if it was minded to give a human or mutt a try

small and far away etc but a bit smaller than golden eagles, bigger than owt else i have been close to

Nicky cigreen



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 9470
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 23 1:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

we have plenty of tawny and barn owls here. Never seen an eagle owl in the wild Once a tawny got caught in the hen netting, and we had to tuck it away in a dark place and release at dusk, so got a close up look at it. Alls well that ended well

Nicky cigreen



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 9470
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 23 1:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

first frogspawn of 2023 spotted here.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 43434
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 23 3:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

good, early perhaps but nice some are laying

Nicky cigreen



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 9470
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 23 3:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I've been recording first sightings of frogspawn in my garden pond for a couple of decades ish. The earliest was last year on 24 Jan, and the latest was 13 March, so there is a lot of variation and today's sighting fits in. I think there might be a trend towards earlier sightings.. but difficult to tell. I should make a graph...

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 43434
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 23 11:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

woodie seems to be visiting, this one has smoothankles

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 43434
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 23 11:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Nicky cigreen wrote:
I've been recording first sightings of frogspawn in my garden pond for a couple of decades ish. The earliest was last year on 24 Jan, and the latest was 13 March, so there is a lot of variation and today's sighting fits in. I think there might be a trend towards earlier sightings.. but difficult to tell. I should make a graph...


have you seen the cherry blossom graph from japan?

CBDay is a rather good marker for climate over many centuries

that was built from lots of local, historical observations, the frogmen might be building a historic/contemporary data base, if not why not start one?

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